Types of Events

DESCRIPTIONS OF EACH EVENT

Each event is described and its abbreviation(s) are in parentheses. Please note that only Dramatic Duet Acting, Humorous Duet Acting, and Performance in the Round involve more than one performer.

Dramatic Duet Acting (DDA)

Two students perform a memorized interpretation of a published dramatic work for two performers around 8 minutes long. Performers are allowed to utilize a table and two chairs in their performance (to sit on, kneel on, etc).

Dramatic Interpretation (DI)

One performer performs a memorized interpretation of a dramatic work, lasting around 8 minutes. Usually a piece has two or more characters in it, all portrayed by the same performer, using different stances, body language, vocal tones, etc.

Extemporaneous Speaking (ES, EX, EXTEMP)

Performers are given a topic, and have 45 minutes to browse materials (magazines, newspapers, etc) that they bring with them to the tournament for information to use in a speech related to the topic. The speech is to be around 6 minutes long, and must use citations and direct quotes from the sources that they utilized in their research.

Humorous Duet Acting (HDA) 

Two students perform a memorized interpretation of a published humorous work for two performers around 8 minutes long. Performers are allowed to utilize a table and two chairs in their performance (to sit on, kneel on, etc).

Humorous Interpretation (HI) 

One performer performs a memorized interpretation of a humorous work, lasting around 8 minutes. Usually a piece has two or more characters in it, all portrayed by the same performer, using different stances, body language, vocal tones, etc.

Impromptu Speaking (IS, IMP)

Students are given a topic, and have eight minutes to prepare and present a speech on the topic they are given. Topics may be quotes, concepts, etc. Usually preparation takes between 2 and 4 minutes, as the longer the speech, usually the better (as long as presentation is organized).

Oratorical Declamation (OD) 

Performers memorize and perform an interpretation of a speech given by another person. The speech is memorized, but is not original, as in Original Oratory. Possible works for this event would be the Gettysburg Address, Kennedy's Inauguration Speech, or any other work (whether it was given by a 'famous' person or not).

Original Comedy (OC) 

Performers write and perform their own humorous script. The topic can be anything, though it should portray something of a story (an involved plot is usually not present, but there should be some logical event progression). Performances should be about eight minutes long.

Original Oratory (OO)

Students select a topic and write a speech exploring the different points and aspects of that topic. Original Oratories are serious speeches written by the performer before the tournament on any topic of his or her choice. Length should be around eight minutes.

Prose Reading (PR)

Students find a short piece of literature and read it to the audience out of a book, using vocal inflection to express emotion and clarify the piece. Memorization is not necessary in this event; however, practice is necessary to eliminate stumbles and gain a greater understanding of the piece.

Radio Speaking (RS)

Performers are given a packet of news stories, and must construct and practice a five minute newscast from it in 45 minutes, containing world, national, local and sports news, along with weather and a commercial. Memorization is not necessary - the emphasis is on clear enunciation and easy understanding of the news material, much as a TV or Radio newscaster aims for. Sometimes scripts are prepared at home.

Special Occasion Speaking (SOS)

A speech is composed at home by the student that covers a certain topic. However, Special Occasion Speeches are generally about lighter subjects than Original Oratories; they are generally entertaining speeches that might be given at company dinners as opposed to speeches meant to persuade or inform an audience of a serious problem or major idea.

Verse Reading (VR)

Students find a poem and read it to the audience out of a book, using vocal inflection to express emotion and clarify the piece. Memorization is not necessary in this event; however, practice is necessary to eliminate stumbles and gain a greater understanding of the piece.

Performance in the Round (PIR)

This event only exists in the IHSA state series. Students not competing in an individual event in the state series are eligible to enter in Performance in the Round. This is a rather short (15-20 minute) interpretation of a script performed by a small group of students. It resembles a short play and is judged as such - however it takes place in a circular performance area with a four chairs equally spaced around the circle - thus space management plays a large role as does acting.